Monthly Archives: November 2017

Final Draw is coming: Hisense invites footballing legend Ruud Gullit to takeover their Social Channels

MOSCOW, Nov. 30, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — Hisense, an official sponsor of the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia™, is proud to announce that it is inviting footballing legend Ruud Gullit to take over their Twitter and Facebook during the Final Draw for 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia™. As a proud sponsor, Hisense have created the unique opportunity as part of […]

Globeleq Increases Stake in South African Renewables

LONDON, Nov. 30, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — Globeleq, a leading developer, owner and operator of electricity generation projects in Africa, has increased its shareholding in the Jeffreys Bay Wind Farm, De Aar Solar and Droogfontein Solar power projects in South Africa, by acquiring Mainstream Renewable Power’s minority shareholdings in the three plants. Globeleq will fund the acquisition through […]

Internet PCS Inc. (BVI) and UnitedCorp Announce the Launch of a New Blockchain Cryptographic Token Called the GIGA

TORTOLA, BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS / ACCESSWIRE / November 29, 2017 / BVI-based Internet PCS Inc. (“iPCS”) and Miami-based United American Corp. (“UnitedCorp”), (OTC PINK: UAMA) announced today the release of a smart contract for its new cryptographic Ethereum-based token called the GIGA, which uses the ERC20 standard. iPCS is the issuer of the token and […]

Media Invitation: #GirlSafe Youth Media Change Makers Expo, Nov. 30

The United States Mission to South Africa will host a day of discussion and engagement with youth on November 30, 2017, to support the 16 Days of Activism against Gender Based Violence (GBV) campaign. Implemented through a grant to the iSchool Press Team and part of ongoing U.S. partnerships with South African government and local organizations, the project addresses the socio-economic challenges that make young women in South Africa vulnerable to contracting HIV, including GBV. Funding is provided by the U.S. Embassy in Pretoria and the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR).

The Youth Media Change Makers Expo will bring together well-known media personalities such as actor Patrick Shai, journalist Aspasia Karras, and performance artist Sethembile Msenzane to discuss creating a #GirlSafe South Africa. Participants will develop a campaign seeking to educate and drive behavior change that will bring an end to GBV. The Expo will see the launch of five Public Service Announcements that have been scripted, filmed, and edited by youth ambassadors, which will be displayed during the remainder of 16 Days of Activism Against Gender Based Violence (November 25-December 10) on Twitter and Facebook at USEmbassySA.

U.S. Embassy Chargeacute; d’ Affaires Jessica Lapenn said, As World AIDS Day approaches on December 1, we reflect on the progress made and challenges that lie ahead. Although great progress has been made in South Africa, many are still at risk � especially young women who have significantly higher HIV infection rates than men. This year, more than ever before, we are placing a special emphasis on combatting gender-based violence (GBV) as a part of our efforts to tackle the socio-economic challenges that make young women so vulnerable to HIV. GBV robs girls and young women of the chance to meet their full potential. It leaves them to struggle with potentially life-threatening outcomes such as HIV infection, as well as severe damage to their dignity and a loss of security. It is not just girls; GBV also affects men and boys, both directly as survivors of violence and indirectly through the cycle of violence. This is why we are so pleased to partner with the iSchool Press Team to deliver the Youth Media Change Makers Expo and #GirlSafe campaign. Through these shared efforts, we can bring an end to GBV.rdquo;

The iSchool Press Team’s mission is to give young South Africans the tools, platform, and confidence to be heard on critical issues affecting themselves and their communities. We are excited to partner with the U.S. Embassy to give our youth a voice to build a #GirlSafe South Africa, where gender based violence is history,rdquo; said Michelle Lissoos, Director, iSchoolAfrica Education Trust.

Media are invited to cover the Youth Expo: 1:00 � 6:30 p.m., November 30 at the Focus Rooms, Sunninghill, Johannesburg.

Source: U.S. Embassy Pretoria, South Africa.

Malaria response at ‘crossroads,’ risks backward slide – UN

After unprecedented global success in controlling malaria, progress has stalled, the United Nations health agency reported Wednesday, citing an estimated five million more cases in 2016 than in 2015, and around 445,000 deaths.

The 2017 World Malaria Report presents a comprehensive state of play in global progress in the fight against malaria.

In recent years, we have made major gains in the fight against malaria, said Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of the World Health Organization (WHO).

We are now at a turning point. Without urgent action, we risk going backwards, and missing the global malaria targets for 2020 and beyond, he added.

The WHO Global Technical Strategy for Malaria calls for reductions of at least 40 per cent in malaria case incidence and mortality rates by the year 2020. Yet, according to the new report, the world is not on track to reach these critical milestones.

A major problem is insufficient funding, resulting in major coverage gaps for insecticide-treated nets, medicines and other life-saving tools.

In 2016, a $2.7 billion investment in malaria control efforts was well below the global $6.5 billion required annually by 2020 to meet the 2030 targets of the WHO global malaria strategy. Providing $800 million, governments of endemic countries represented 31 per cent of the total funding.

Probing the numbers

The report shows that, in 2016, there were an estimated 216 million cases of malaria in 91 countries � up from 211 million cases in 2015 � with a global malaria death tally estimated at 445,000 compared to 446,000 the previous year.

While the rate of new cases of malaria has fallen overall, since 2014 the trend has levelled off and even reversed in some regions. Malaria mortality rates followed a similar pattern.

The African region continues to bear an estimated 90 per cent of all malaria cases and deaths worldwide, with 15 countries � all but one in sub-Saharan Africa � carrying 80 per cent of the global malaria burden.

Clearly, if we are to get the global malaria response back on track, supporting the most heavily affected countries in the African region must be the primary focus, said Mr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus.

In most malaria-affected countries, sleeping under an insecticide-treated bednet (ITN) is the most common and effective infection-prevention method. Spraying insecticide inside homes is also effective.

While the African region has seen a major increase in diagnostic testing in the public health sector � with 70 per cent of those treated having received artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs), the most effective antimalarial medicines � access to the public health system in many areas remains low. National-level surveys there show that only about 34 per cent of children with a fever see a public health medical provider.

The report also outlines additional challenges in the global malaria response, including the risks posed by conflict and crises in malaria endemic zones. WHO is currently supporting malaria responses in Nigeria, South Sudan, Venezuela and Yemen, where ongoing humanitarian crises pose serious health risks.

We are at a crossroads in the response to malaria, said Dr. Pedro Alonso, Director of the WHO Global Malaria Programme.

We hope this report serves as a wake-up call for the global health community. Meeting the global malaria targets will only be possible through greater investment and expanded coverage of core tools that prevent, diagnose and treat malaria. Robust financing for the research and development of new tools is equally critical, he asserted.

At the same time, Ray Chambers, the UN Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for Health in Agenda 2030 and for Malaria noted that the report sends the clear message that progress does not happen by chance.

The gains we have achieved in the fight against malaria since 2000 � nearly seven million lives saved, and hundreds of millions of infections averted � were accomplished through the concerted actions of many champions, he pointed out.

He said that the commitment of community health workers to endemic country governments and their external partners has positioned the global malaria response as one of the greatest public health achievements in the world.

However, he added, the data show that our progress is stalling and we risk reversing the hard-won gains. We must double-down on our commitments, bring new technologies to bear, and increase investments to bring us back on track to end malaria for good.

Source: UN Dispatch

Malaria response at ‘crossroads,’ risks backward slide – UN

After unprecedented global success in controlling malaria, progress has stalled, the United Nations health agency reported Wednesday, citing an estimated five million more cases in 2016 than in 2015, and around 445,000 deaths.

The 2017 World Malaria Report presents a comprehensive state of play in global progress in the fight against malaria.

In recent years, we have made major gains in the fight against malaria, said Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of the World Health Organization (WHO).

We are now at a turning point. Without urgent action, we risk going backwards, and missing the global malaria targets for 2020 and beyond, he added.

The WHO Global Technical Strategy for Malaria calls for reductions of at least 40 per cent in malaria case incidence and mortality rates by the year 2020. Yet, according to the new report, the world is not on track to reach these critical milestones.

A major problem is insufficient funding, resulting in major coverage gaps for insecticide-treated nets, medicines and other life-saving tools.

In 2016, a $2.7 billion investment in malaria control efforts was well below the global $6.5 billion required annually by 2020 to meet the 2030 targets of the WHO global malaria strategy. Providing $800 million, governments of endemic countries represented 31 per cent of the total funding.

Probing the numbers

The report shows that, in 2016, there were an estimated 216 million cases of malaria in 91 countries � up from 211 million cases in 2015 � with a global malaria death tally estimated at 445,000 compared to 446,000 the previous year.

While the rate of new cases of malaria has fallen overall, since 2014 the trend has levelled off and even reversed in some regions. Malaria mortality rates followed a similar pattern.

The African region continues to bear an estimated 90 per cent of all malaria cases and deaths worldwide, with 15 countries � all but one in sub-Saharan Africa � carrying 80 per cent of the global malaria burden.

Clearly, if we are to get the global malaria response back on track, supporting the most heavily affected countries in the African region must be the primary focus, said Mr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus.

In most malaria-affected countries, sleeping under an insecticide-treated bednet (ITN) is the most common and effective infection-prevention method. Spraying insecticide inside homes is also effective.

While the African region has seen a major increase in diagnostic testing in the public health sector � with 70 per cent of those treated having received artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs), the most effective antimalarial medicines � access to the public health system in many areas remains low. National-level surveys there show that only about 34 per cent of children with a fever see a public health medical provider.

The report also outlines additional challenges in the global malaria response, including the risks posed by conflict and crises in malaria endemic zones. WHO is currently supporting malaria responses in Nigeria, South Sudan, Venezuela and Yemen, where ongoing humanitarian crises pose serious health risks.

We are at a crossroads in the response to malaria, said Dr. Pedro Alonso, Director of the WHO Global Malaria Programme.

We hope this report serves as a wake-up call for the global health community. Meeting the global malaria targets will only be possible through greater investment and expanded coverage of core tools that prevent, diagnose and treat malaria. Robust financing for the research and development of new tools is equally critical, he asserted.

At the same time, Ray Chambers, the UN Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for Health in Agenda 2030 and for Malaria noted that the report sends the clear message that progress does not happen by chance.

The gains we have achieved in the fight against malaria since 2000 � nearly seven million lives saved, and hundreds of millions of infections averted � were accomplished through the concerted actions of many champions, he pointed out.

He said that the commitment of community health workers to endemic country governments and their external partners has positioned the global malaria response as one of the greatest public health achievements in the world.

However, he added, the data show that our progress is stalling and we risk reversing the hard-won gains. We must double-down on our commitments, bring new technologies to bear, and increase investments to bring us back on track to end malaria for good.

Source: UN Dispatch

Media Invitation: #GirlSafe Youth Media Change Makers Expo, Nov. 30

The United States Mission to South Africa will host a day of discussion and engagement with youth on November 30, 2017, to support the 16 Days of Activism against Gender Based Violence (GBV) campaign. Implemented through a grant to the iSchool Press Team and part of ongoing U.S. partnerships with South African government and local organizations, the project addresses the socio-economic challenges that make young women in South Africa vulnerable to contracting HIV, including GBV. Funding is provided by the U.S. Embassy in Pretoria and the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR).

The Youth Media Change Makers Expo will bring together well-known media personalities such as actor Patrick Shai, journalist Aspasia Karras, and performance artist Sethembile Msenzane to discuss creating a #GirlSafe South Africa. Participants will develop a campaign seeking to educate and drive behavior change that will bring an end to GBV. The Expo will see the launch of five Public Service Announcements that have been scripted, filmed, and edited by youth ambassadors, which will be displayed during the remainder of 16 Days of Activism Against Gender Based Violence (November 25-December 10) on Twitter and Facebook at USEmbassySA.

U.S. Embassy Chargeacute; d’ Affaires Jessica Lapenn said, As World AIDS Day approaches on December 1, we reflect on the progress made and challenges that lie ahead. Although great progress has been made in South Africa, many are still at risk � especially young women who have significantly higher HIV infection rates than men. This year, more than ever before, we are placing a special emphasis on combatting gender-based violence (GBV) as a part of our efforts to tackle the socio-economic challenges that make young women so vulnerable to HIV. GBV robs girls and young women of the chance to meet their full potential. It leaves them to struggle with potentially life-threatening outcomes such as HIV infection, as well as severe damage to their dignity and a loss of security. It is not just girls; GBV also affects men and boys, both directly as survivors of violence and indirectly through the cycle of violence. This is why we are so pleased to partner with the iSchool Press Team to deliver the Youth Media Change Makers Expo and #GirlSafe campaign. Through these shared efforts, we can bring an end to GBV.rdquo;

The iSchool Press Team’s mission is to give young South Africans the tools, platform, and confidence to be heard on critical issues affecting themselves and their communities. We are excited to partner with the U.S. Embassy to give our youth a voice to build a #GirlSafe South Africa, where gender based violence is history,rdquo; said Michelle Lissoos, Director, iSchoolAfrica Education Trust.

Media are invited to cover the Youth Expo: 1:00 � 6:30 p.m., November 30 at the Focus Rooms, Sunninghill, Johannesburg.

Source: U.S. Embassy Pretoria, South Africa.

Zimbabwe Struggles to Face Mugabe-Era Crimes

HARARE For 37 years under the iron-fisted rule of Robert Mugabe, Zimbabwe has been battered by human rights abuses, endemic corruption, and mismanagement that sank the economy and reduced the nation’s once-strong agricultural sector to ruins.The natio…

Uhuru Kenyatta Inaugurated as Kenya’s President

NAIROBI After two elections, several Supreme Court petitions, frequent protests and many other twists and turns, Uhuru Kenyatta finally was sworn in Tuesday for a second term as president of Kenya.I undertake today to be the custodian of the dreams of…